Title

Translating Occupational Science to Health Behavior: The Pick-Two to Stick-Too Intervention

1

Location

Great Room 1A & 1B

Start Time

21-10-2017 2:30 PM

End Time

21-10-2017 3:30 PM

Session Type

Research Paper

Abstract

Purpose

Ten years after its introduction, the role of the transactional perspective in occupational science has grown (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). Although the perspective has been used for a variety of purposes, application remains primarily associated with qualitative modes of inquiry and within the domain of occupational science. We argue that the perspective has broader potential in empirical occupational science as well as in the fields of population health, health promotion, and intervention science (Fritz & Cutchin, 2016). The purpose of this paper is to advance the translation of occupational science to intervention science through providing a heuristic example of how elements of the perspective informed the development of, and were operationalized in, a recently conducted behavioral feasibility trial.

Methods

We begin by discussing a key limitation of health behavior research—an over-reliance on theories that privilege individual agency while neglecting how contextual influences shape health behavior (Crosby & Noar, 2010). We then explain how those issues are relevant problems for occupational science, especially if using a transactional perspective. We continue by presenting how key principles of the transactional perspective; habits, problematic situations, and inquiry informed the development of, and were operationalized in, the Pick Two to Stick Too (P2S2) habit development intervention. The P2S2 is an 8-week long, hybrid (face-to-face and tele-coaching) habit-development intervention designed to target the development of physical activity and dietary habits among middle aged adults with Metabolic Syndrome. Using a prospective, single group, pre-posttest design, we recently evaluated the feasibility of the P2S2 among a sample of 40 African American adults ages 40 and older with Metabolic Syndrome who were recruited from the emergency department in Detroit, MI.

Report of Results

Data and findings presented from the feasibility trial include qualitative data about participants’ habit-development plans, participants’ experiences of inquiring into their daily life contexts, the behaviors participants chose to develop into habits, the situation linked to emerging habits, and the success (and challenges) participants experienced when engaging in habit-development efforts over the course of the intervention period. We also present quantitative data about the preliminary efficacy of the program on the clinical endpoints of blood pressure, weight, body mass index, and waist circumference.

Implications Related to Occupational Science

We conclude by discussing benefits and challenges of utilizing the transactional perspective in intervention research and offer insights about the significance of these potentialities for the larger project of occupational science and transdisciplinary contributions.

Keywords: Intervention science, health behavior, transactional perspective

Questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

  • What opportunities do you (audience members) see for translating occupational sciences into health promotion/prevention programs?
  • What issues/problems/challenges do you foresee in utilizing occupational science scholarship in intervention science?
  • Can we translate this type of work into intervention science without losing the holistic intention of the perspective?

References

References

Cutchin, M. P., & Dickie, V. A. (2013). Transactional perspectives on occupation: An introduction and rationale. Dordrecht: Springer.

Crosby, R., & Noar, S. M. (2010). Theory development in public health promotion: Are we there yet? Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 33(4), 259-263. doi: 10.1007/s10865-010-9260-1

Fritz, H., & Cutchin, M. P. (2016). Integrating the science of habit: Opportunities for occupational therapy. OTJR: Occupation, Participation and Health. doi: 10.1177/1539449216643307

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Oct 21st, 2:30 PM Oct 21st, 3:30 PM

Translating Occupational Science to Health Behavior: The Pick-Two to Stick-Too Intervention

Great Room 1A & 1B

Purpose

Ten years after its introduction, the role of the transactional perspective in occupational science has grown (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). Although the perspective has been used for a variety of purposes, application remains primarily associated with qualitative modes of inquiry and within the domain of occupational science. We argue that the perspective has broader potential in empirical occupational science as well as in the fields of population health, health promotion, and intervention science (Fritz & Cutchin, 2016). The purpose of this paper is to advance the translation of occupational science to intervention science through providing a heuristic example of how elements of the perspective informed the development of, and were operationalized in, a recently conducted behavioral feasibility trial.

Methods

We begin by discussing a key limitation of health behavior research—an over-reliance on theories that privilege individual agency while neglecting how contextual influences shape health behavior (Crosby & Noar, 2010). We then explain how those issues are relevant problems for occupational science, especially if using a transactional perspective. We continue by presenting how key principles of the transactional perspective; habits, problematic situations, and inquiry informed the development of, and were operationalized in, the Pick Two to Stick Too (P2S2) habit development intervention. The P2S2 is an 8-week long, hybrid (face-to-face and tele-coaching) habit-development intervention designed to target the development of physical activity and dietary habits among middle aged adults with Metabolic Syndrome. Using a prospective, single group, pre-posttest design, we recently evaluated the feasibility of the P2S2 among a sample of 40 African American adults ages 40 and older with Metabolic Syndrome who were recruited from the emergency department in Detroit, MI.

Report of Results

Data and findings presented from the feasibility trial include qualitative data about participants’ habit-development plans, participants’ experiences of inquiring into their daily life contexts, the behaviors participants chose to develop into habits, the situation linked to emerging habits, and the success (and challenges) participants experienced when engaging in habit-development efforts over the course of the intervention period. We also present quantitative data about the preliminary efficacy of the program on the clinical endpoints of blood pressure, weight, body mass index, and waist circumference.

Implications Related to Occupational Science

We conclude by discussing benefits and challenges of utilizing the transactional perspective in intervention research and offer insights about the significance of these potentialities for the larger project of occupational science and transdisciplinary contributions.

Keywords: Intervention science, health behavior, transactional perspective

Questions to further occupational science concepts and ideas:

  • What opportunities do you (audience members) see for translating occupational sciences into health promotion/prevention programs?
  • What issues/problems/challenges do you foresee in utilizing occupational science scholarship in intervention science?
  • Can we translate this type of work into intervention science without losing the holistic intention of the perspective?