Title

The Transactional Perspective's Community Orientation

Location

Great Room 1A & 1B

Start Time

21-10-2017 2:30 PM

End Time

21-10-2017 3:30 PM

Session Type

Theoretical Paper

Abstract

Intent: More than ten years after introducing the transactional perspective on occupation (Dickie, Cutchin & Humphry, 2006), we take the opportunity to critically examine and suggest enhancements to the perspective. Our intent is to lay the groundwork for what could be a new phase in the transactional perspective’s development by arguing for the value of its community-level orientation toward processes of occupation, inquiry, and practice.

Argument: After providing a background that presents why we think there is a need for the community orientation of the transactional perspective to be foregrounded, we provide a synthesis of John Dewey’s social pragmatism. We discuss his core concepts of situation, inquiry, social reconstruction, social inquiry, and community, and we put that thinking in a methodological frame to suggest its utility in research and practice. Although others within the disciplines of occupational science and occupational therapy, particularly outside of the U.S., have studied community occupation and reported community projects and models, Dewey’s framework for social inquiry may be useful in assessing and adapting existing models for community building, advocacy, and change.

Importance to occupational science: Occupational scientists have increasingly recognized the value of transactional perspectives on occupation (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). Any theoretical orientation, however, should be an organic system of ideas that serve the purpose of an academic community. As occupational science evolves and grows, there is considerable value in the critical assessment and additional development of this perspective, especially as it relates to a field becoming more engaged in community-level and community-engaged research (Aldrich & Marterella, 2014).

Conclusion: Our view is that the transactional perspective has value for occupational science and that this argument about the development of the perspective’s community orientation will enhance to value and provide important bases for additional community-oriented research in the discipline. Moreover, this dimension of the perspective can usefully support the trend towards more community practice in occupational therapy.

Keywords: social reconstruction, social inquiry, pragmatism

Discussion questions:

  • What aspects of this argument need further explanation?
  • How does Dewey’s concept of social inquiry translate to your research or not?
  • Does the argument and its key concepts assist our attempt to develop the perspective in important directions?
  • How does these concepts and perspective widen the lens of practitioners?

References

Aldrich, R. & Marterella, A. (2014). Community-engaged research: A path for occupational science in the changing university landscape. Journal of Occupational Science, 21(2), 210-225. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2012.714077

Cutchin, M. P., & Dickie, V. (2013), Transactional perspectives on occupation. Dordrecht: Springer. Available from: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-94-007-4429-5_19

Dickie, V., Cutchin, M. P., & Humphry, R. (2006). Occupation as transactional experience: A critique of individualism in occupational science. Journal of Occupational Science, 13(1), 83-93. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14427591.2006.9686573

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Oct 21st, 2:30 PM Oct 21st, 3:30 PM

The Transactional Perspective's Community Orientation

Great Room 1A & 1B

Intent: More than ten years after introducing the transactional perspective on occupation (Dickie, Cutchin & Humphry, 2006), we take the opportunity to critically examine and suggest enhancements to the perspective. Our intent is to lay the groundwork for what could be a new phase in the transactional perspective’s development by arguing for the value of its community-level orientation toward processes of occupation, inquiry, and practice.

Argument: After providing a background that presents why we think there is a need for the community orientation of the transactional perspective to be foregrounded, we provide a synthesis of John Dewey’s social pragmatism. We discuss his core concepts of situation, inquiry, social reconstruction, social inquiry, and community, and we put that thinking in a methodological frame to suggest its utility in research and practice. Although others within the disciplines of occupational science and occupational therapy, particularly outside of the U.S., have studied community occupation and reported community projects and models, Dewey’s framework for social inquiry may be useful in assessing and adapting existing models for community building, advocacy, and change.

Importance to occupational science: Occupational scientists have increasingly recognized the value of transactional perspectives on occupation (Cutchin & Dickie, 2013). Any theoretical orientation, however, should be an organic system of ideas that serve the purpose of an academic community. As occupational science evolves and grows, there is considerable value in the critical assessment and additional development of this perspective, especially as it relates to a field becoming more engaged in community-level and community-engaged research (Aldrich & Marterella, 2014).

Conclusion: Our view is that the transactional perspective has value for occupational science and that this argument about the development of the perspective’s community orientation will enhance to value and provide important bases for additional community-oriented research in the discipline. Moreover, this dimension of the perspective can usefully support the trend towards more community practice in occupational therapy.

Keywords: social reconstruction, social inquiry, pragmatism

Discussion questions:

  • What aspects of this argument need further explanation?
  • How does Dewey’s concept of social inquiry translate to your research or not?
  • Does the argument and its key concepts assist our attempt to develop the perspective in important directions?
  • How does these concepts and perspective widen the lens of practitioners?