Date of Award

1-29-1990

Degree Type

Thesis (On-Campus Access Only)

First Advisor

Mike Steele

Abstract

This study attempted to describe if and how teachers are teaching to reduce the levels of prejudice of middle and high school students in the Oregon counties of Clatsop and Tillamook. It was found that a majority of teachers believed that they should be teaching to reduce prejudiced thinking, however only 33% of the teachers said they included such a unit in their curricula. A review of the literature showed that certain methods were effective, however teachers who indicated that they were teaching to reduce prejudiced thinking showed no preference for those, or any, methods. Also, there was no significance of choice of methods for those teachers who had taken a course on how to teach to reduce prejudice compared to those who had not taken such a course. In addition, those who felt they should be teaching to reduce prejudiced thinking gave no clear response as to why they were not doing so.

Two suggestions for further research were given. First, that the courses the teachers had taken on how to teach to reduce prejudice be investigated based on the criteria set forth in the Review of the Literature, and second, that further research should investigate why teachers who believed that they should be teaching to reduce prejudice were not actually doing so.

Three suggestions for immediate action were also given. Teachers and administrators could form a committee with three objectives: First, that they search for and bring to the coastal areas a course on how to teach to reduce prejudice that meets the criteria set forth in the Review of the Literature; second, that a resource guide be developed identifying local resources and where to find them; and third, that several pre-packaged curricula be studied based on the criteria set forth in the Review of the Literature so that recommendations could be made to teachers who were interested in using them.

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