Title of Submission

Student Computers in University Classrooms: A Detriment or Boon to Learning?

Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

Leigh is an Assistant Professor and Pediatric Audiologist at Pacific University’s School of Audiology. Prior to joining Pacific in 2014, she worked as a Research Audiologist at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Leigh holds a Bachelor’s Degree from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a Doctor of Audiology degree from Indiana University-Bloomington.

Leigh's clinical area of expertise is pediatric diagnostics, with a special interest in the birth to three population. In her role at Pacific, she also teaches classroom courses focused on pediatrics, as well as precepts doctoral students in Pacific's onsite clinic, the Pacific EarClinic.

Abstract

A common topic of discussion in higher education is student use of personal computers in the classroom and whether it distracts or enhances learning as well as a sense of community in higher education. In making the shift to computer-limited or free university classrooms, students can develop not only better higher-order learning skills, but leadership skills as well.

The majority of literature on student computers in the classroom proposes at least limited use of personal computers in the classroom as learning outcomes increase with decreased computer presence. Student computer use in university classrooms can also be viewed through the lens of leadership.

Removing computers from the classroom will allow students a better space to develop the interpersonal and professional skills necessary to lead, alongside the higher-level learning of didactic material. By making the shift to computer limited or free university classrooms, students can develop not only better advanced learning skills, but effective leadership skills as well.

Location

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

Start Date

25-1-2019 10:45 AM

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Jan 25th, 10:45 AM

Student Computers in University Classrooms: A Detriment or Boon to Learning?

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

A common topic of discussion in higher education is student use of personal computers in the classroom and whether it distracts or enhances learning as well as a sense of community in higher education. In making the shift to computer-limited or free university classrooms, students can develop not only better higher-order learning skills, but leadership skills as well.

The majority of literature on student computers in the classroom proposes at least limited use of personal computers in the classroom as learning outcomes increase with decreased computer presence. Student computer use in university classrooms can also be viewed through the lens of leadership.

Removing computers from the classroom will allow students a better space to develop the interpersonal and professional skills necessary to lead, alongside the higher-level learning of didactic material. By making the shift to computer limited or free university classrooms, students can develop not only better advanced learning skills, but effective leadership skills as well.