Title of Submission

Conversations on Race

Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

L. Soul Brown is a doctoral student at Pacific University whose interest is in the practice of racial conversations, counter narrative, and witnessing for addressing inequities in higher education and society. She currently is a member of several community- and school-based DEI committees in Massachusetts. Professionally, Ms. Brown is the Director of Grants Development for MassBay Community College, where she provides leadership in aligning institutional strategic priorities and faculty research with available public and private funding. Prior to working in higher education, Soul directed grassroots nonprofits that combined art and media literacy with youth organizing. She is also a published poet.

Abstract

More students of color enroll in U.S. colleges today than in previous decades due to changing demographics and rising aspirations. However, racist incidents on college campuses, persistent achievement gaps, and lack of faculty of color indicate there are race-related problems in higher education.

Research shows that conversations on race increase cultural competency, promote empathy, reduce prejudice, improve relations among conflict group members, and develop critical awareness of privilege and oppression. Yet, educational leaders rarely engage in racial conversations to affect systems change.

This paper examines the growing body of literature on the use of race conversations in schools and colleges. Additionally, it considers how race conversations might be aligned with systems thinking for dismantling structural racism within the higher education system.

Location

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

Start Date

25-1-2019 3:45 PM

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Jan 25th, 3:45 PM

Conversations on Race

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

More students of color enroll in U.S. colleges today than in previous decades due to changing demographics and rising aspirations. However, racist incidents on college campuses, persistent achievement gaps, and lack of faculty of color indicate there are race-related problems in higher education.

Research shows that conversations on race increase cultural competency, promote empathy, reduce prejudice, improve relations among conflict group members, and develop critical awareness of privilege and oppression. Yet, educational leaders rarely engage in racial conversations to affect systems change.

This paper examines the growing body of literature on the use of race conversations in schools and colleges. Additionally, it considers how race conversations might be aligned with systems thinking for dismantling structural racism within the higher education system.