Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

Jessika is a higher education professional who is deeply committed to educational and social equity. As a former first generation college student of color, she understands the importance of creating an inclusive campus climate.

Currently, Jessika works in the Office for Institutional Diversity at Reed College to create a diverse and inclusive learning, teaching, and working environment. She develops initiatives designed to support the recruitment, transition, and retention of historically underrepresented students, staff, and faculty in education.

Jessika holds a B.A. in Political Science and English from Southern Methodist University and a M.A. in Educational Administration and Leadership from University of the Pacific. She serves on the Oregon Women in Higher Education Board of Directors and the NASPA Region V Advisory Board. Jessica lives by her motto: “challenge the status quo in favor of wild dreams – and don’t ever settle for anything less.”

Abstract

Research shows many faculty members in higher education do not engage in conversations about race in the classroom, and the consequences are significant for all students but particularly for students of color (Linder et al., 2013; Pasque et al., 2013; Quaye, 2012). Ignoring issues of race can lead to an increase in racial conflict and microaggressions. When ignored or mishandled, racial conflict can distract students from their schoolwork, cause emotional distress, perpetuate poor interpersonal and intergroup relations, silence students of color, and undermine the learning process (Pasque et al., 2013). Given these negative impacts for students of color, it is important for universities and colleges to address the lack of training opportunities for educators to develop inclusive pedagogical skills. Teacher educator programs prepare educators to teach in diverse and multicultural settings; however, educator development programs are not required for faculty and staff in higher education. Therefore, faculty and staff are underprepared to teach and support diverse student populations. Using a systems theory framework, I demonstrate how the inability to engage in conversations about race and racism, address racial microaggressions, and resolve racial conflict in the classroom is a direct result of a system that does not provide educator development opportunities focused on inclusive teaching. Given the benefits of inclusive pedagogy on student learning, I recommend universities and colleges shift their framework on how educators teach and create opportunities for faculty and staff to develop inclusive pedagogical practices in order to foster an inclusive learning community.

Location

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

Start Date

25-1-2019 10:45 AM

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Jan 25th, 10:45 AM

Developing Inclusive Pedagogical Skills for Educators in Higher Education

Hillsboro Campus, HPC2, Atrium

Research shows many faculty members in higher education do not engage in conversations about race in the classroom, and the consequences are significant for all students but particularly for students of color (Linder et al., 2013; Pasque et al., 2013; Quaye, 2012). Ignoring issues of race can lead to an increase in racial conflict and microaggressions. When ignored or mishandled, racial conflict can distract students from their schoolwork, cause emotional distress, perpetuate poor interpersonal and intergroup relations, silence students of color, and undermine the learning process (Pasque et al., 2013). Given these negative impacts for students of color, it is important for universities and colleges to address the lack of training opportunities for educators to develop inclusive pedagogical skills. Teacher educator programs prepare educators to teach in diverse and multicultural settings; however, educator development programs are not required for faculty and staff in higher education. Therefore, faculty and staff are underprepared to teach and support diverse student populations. Using a systems theory framework, I demonstrate how the inability to engage in conversations about race and racism, address racial microaggressions, and resolve racial conflict in the classroom is a direct result of a system that does not provide educator development opportunities focused on inclusive teaching. Given the benefits of inclusive pedagogy on student learning, I recommend universities and colleges shift their framework on how educators teach and create opportunities for faculty and staff to develop inclusive pedagogical practices in order to foster an inclusive learning community.