Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

Lesleigh has been an occupational therapist for eight years, graduating from Pacific University in 2009. Shortly after graduatio, she moved to Maryland and worked at The Johns Hopkins Hospital and Kennedy Krieger Institute. While there Lesleigh obtained her Assistive Technology Professional certification and specialized in seating and mobility. She then moved to Alaska in 2014. Lesleigh currently works at Providence Alaska Medical Center in inpatient pediatrics and has spent three years teaching as an adjunct faculty member for the Creighton University distance-pathway OTD program there. Lesleigh has had amazing opportunities throughout her career thus far in rural and urban facilities and has dabbled in OT in most settings: home health, hospice, acute, long term care, feeding/swallowing, outpatient, pediatrics, NICU, splinting/casting, seating/positioning, and burn management.

Lesleigh is interested in researching how to bring an interprofessional collaborative model of healthcare to less progressive areas and how this impacts patient care.

Abstract

Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of any cancer in the United States, and is increasing in developed countries throughout the world. Lung cancer is typically diagnosed at stage III or IV due to presentation of non-specific symptoms and a lack of awareness by patients and providers alike. However, diagnosis at stage I or II significantly increases one’s survival rate. Screening for lung cancer is difficult with tests that are expensive, potentially harmful, or ineffective.

Location

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Start Date

26-1-2019 9:30 AM

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Jan 26th, 9:30 AM

Promotion of Early Detection of Lung Cancer in Primary Care

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of any cancer in the United States, and is increasing in developed countries throughout the world. Lung cancer is typically diagnosed at stage III or IV due to presentation of non-specific symptoms and a lack of awareness by patients and providers alike. However, diagnosis at stage I or II significantly increases one’s survival rate. Screening for lung cancer is difficult with tests that are expensive, potentially harmful, or ineffective.