Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

Kate has worked at Pacific University’s Forest Grove campus as the School & Community Partnership Coordinator for the School of Learning & Teaching since March 2016. Her current role includes coordinating placements and placement processes for teacher candidates and practicum teachers, student teacher supervision, and fostering partnerships with K-12 schools and community organizations.

Kate earned dual Bachelor of Science degrees in Elementary Education and Liberal Studies: Math/Science from Rowan University in May 2009. She then spent seven years teaching middle school math in Southampton Township Public School District in Southampton, NJ while completing a Master of Science degree in Educational Leadership from Delaware Valley University in May 2013 and obtaining administrative certifications. Kate is currently a PhD student in Pacific University’s Education & Leadership program. Her research interests include interprofessional field placements, K-12/University partnerships, critical clinical elements in education, and teacher candidate dispositions.

Abstract

Field placements in education should be a byproduct of strong partnerships between the university and K-12 school districts. Effective teacher preparation cannot exist without relationships being built between educator preparations programs (EPPs) and K-12 schools to provide purposeful settings for teacher candidates to learn through observation and practice of theory in action (Darling-Hammond, 2010). Time must be put into these relationships, as successful partnerships require careful preparation, outstanding implementation, and thorough follow through (Bullough, Draper, Smith, & Birrell, 2004; Powers, 2004). There should be a mutually agreed upon shared vision based on a passion for the issues at hand, a variety of roles based on the resources of each partner, a system for measuring outcomes, and consistently be looking to improve upon those outcomes (Catelli, Costello, & Padovano, 2000; Guillen & Zeichner, 2018; Lee, 2018; Tomanek, 2005).

Fieldwork in education is the essential time for teacher candidates to bridge the gap between their theoretical coursework and actual practice of teaching. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE, 2018) Clinical Practice Commission believes that clinically-based work is the foundational component upon which a candidate’s success in the classroom is built. With the student population and behaviors becoming increasingly diverse, EPPs must design their curricula to include coherent field-based assignments, built with strong relationships to schools, to prepare candidates for complex classrooms.Creating this coherence within an EPP can be difficult due to departmental disconnects, instructional freedom, and hiring of adjunct faculty who may be as connected to the vision of the EPP, but candidates receiving tightly connected course and fieldwork leave the program better able to support student learning (Darling-Hammond, 2006).

Location

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Start Date

26-1-2019 9:30 AM

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Jan 26th, 9:30 AM

Clinical Practice in Education: Performance Assessment in the Third Space

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Field placements in education should be a byproduct of strong partnerships between the university and K-12 school districts. Effective teacher preparation cannot exist without relationships being built between educator preparations programs (EPPs) and K-12 schools to provide purposeful settings for teacher candidates to learn through observation and practice of theory in action (Darling-Hammond, 2010). Time must be put into these relationships, as successful partnerships require careful preparation, outstanding implementation, and thorough follow through (Bullough, Draper, Smith, & Birrell, 2004; Powers, 2004). There should be a mutually agreed upon shared vision based on a passion for the issues at hand, a variety of roles based on the resources of each partner, a system for measuring outcomes, and consistently be looking to improve upon those outcomes (Catelli, Costello, & Padovano, 2000; Guillen & Zeichner, 2018; Lee, 2018; Tomanek, 2005).

Fieldwork in education is the essential time for teacher candidates to bridge the gap between their theoretical coursework and actual practice of teaching. The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE, 2018) Clinical Practice Commission believes that clinically-based work is the foundational component upon which a candidate’s success in the classroom is built. With the student population and behaviors becoming increasingly diverse, EPPs must design their curricula to include coherent field-based assignments, built with strong relationships to schools, to prepare candidates for complex classrooms.Creating this coherence within an EPP can be difficult due to departmental disconnects, instructional freedom, and hiring of adjunct faculty who may be as connected to the vision of the EPP, but candidates receiving tightly connected course and fieldwork leave the program better able to support student learning (Darling-Hammond, 2006).