Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

Talina is a physical therapist and adjunct faculty member to Pacific University’s School of Physical Therapy. Her clinical practice is centered around geriatrics. She currently coordinates an Outpatient Physical Therapy program within a geriatric residential community where she also works in Home Health and Skilled Nursing settings. As an instructor for the Physical Therapy program, Talina assists in lab portions of Physical Agents. She teaches the Massage portion of Physical Agents, and will also be teaching Therapeutic Exercise this spring, a course Talina has been an assistant instructor in for the past two years. Talina has conducted research looking into the barriers to the use of Physical Therapy within community health centers, and her current research interests revolve around the intersection of mobility, aging, culture and geography, educating for self-efficacy, and physical health in under-served populations. Talina has a Bachelor’s degree in Physiology, a Clinical Doctorate in Physical Therapy, and is licensed and certified in Massage Therapy. She is a member of the American Physical Therapy Association and the American Physical Therapy Association’s Section on Geriatrics.

Abstract

Only 21% of U.S. adults meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity (CDC, 2014) despite of widespread advertising of the power of exercise to improve health and prevent disability. Racial minorities and older adults, growing parts of the U.S. population, are even less likely to meet these guidelines (CDC, 2014). This study will take three approaches to better understand the role of identity in exercise engagement among Black older adults (BOAs). Quantitative inquiries will explore the relationship between physical activity identity, physical activity participation, and physical function. Qualitative inquiry will explore how BOAs conceptualize physical activity and relate it to their concepts of self. Outcomes of the studies will be used to gain insight into whether identity has a role in physical engagement and function in a minority older adult population and whether it could be leveraged to improve healthy activity engagement.

Location

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Start Date

26-1-2019 11:00 AM

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Jan 26th, 11:00 AM

Who Are You and How Do You Move?: A Study Proposal

HPC2 Building, Atrium

Only 21% of U.S. adults meet the recommended guidelines for physical activity (CDC, 2014) despite of widespread advertising of the power of exercise to improve health and prevent disability. Racial minorities and older adults, growing parts of the U.S. population, are even less likely to meet these guidelines (CDC, 2014). This study will take three approaches to better understand the role of identity in exercise engagement among Black older adults (BOAs). Quantitative inquiries will explore the relationship between physical activity identity, physical activity participation, and physical function. Qualitative inquiry will explore how BOAs conceptualize physical activity and relate it to their concepts of self. Outcomes of the studies will be used to gain insight into whether identity has a role in physical engagement and function in a minority older adult population and whether it could be leveraged to improve healthy activity engagement.