Presenter Information

Ryan AielloFollow

Presenter Type

Student

Brief Bio Sketch

I am Ryan Aiello (He, Him, His) and am the Dean of Student Development at Portland Community College (PCC), Rock Creek. I have spent my entire professional career of nineteen years in Student Affairs, most recently at Portland Community College, but also some seasons at Pacific University, Eastern Washington University, and Washington State University. Both my undergraduate and master’s degrees were in the fields of Psychology, Sociology, and Counseling. I am fascinated looking at and developing systems, organizational structures, and individuals and groups, all with a lens of equity and inclusion.

Abstract

Higher Education in the United States has continued to evolve around access, opportunity, and development in rapid ways, especially post-World War II. By the 1960’s, coupled with the Civil Rights Movements, Community Colleges and Universities were developing systems to begin efforts in access and opportunities for underrepresented groups, mostly around gender and race. Over time student populations have grown in diversity and the further development of Student Affairs has provided stronger support around equity for students to help with the success of their overall educational goals. Though we have seen increased diversity in our student populations over the last 100 years, the rate of diversity of faculty and staff within Higher Education remains disproportionate in comparison to students. This presentation is the beginning of exploring and building upon past research and now asking question, "How does an educational institution recruit and retain faculty and staff of color, specifically within Community Colleges?"

Location

Tran Library, Media Commons

Start Date

January 2018

End Date

January 2018

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Jan 27th, 10:50 AM Jan 27th, 11:00 AM

Equity & Inclusion: Diversifying Faculty & Staff

Tran Library, Media Commons

Higher Education in the United States has continued to evolve around access, opportunity, and development in rapid ways, especially post-World War II. By the 1960’s, coupled with the Civil Rights Movements, Community Colleges and Universities were developing systems to begin efforts in access and opportunities for underrepresented groups, mostly around gender and race. Over time student populations have grown in diversity and the further development of Student Affairs has provided stronger support around equity for students to help with the success of their overall educational goals. Though we have seen increased diversity in our student populations over the last 100 years, the rate of diversity of faculty and staff within Higher Education remains disproportionate in comparison to students. This presentation is the beginning of exploring and building upon past research and now asking question, "How does an educational institution recruit and retain faculty and staff of color, specifically within Community Colleges?"