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Dissertation

Female and Male Psychopathy: Interpersonal Differences

1 January 2017

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between psychopathy and interpersonal problems in female and male inmates. Participants were 376 female and male inmates from three Oregon state correctional facilities. The Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (IIP–64; Horowitz, Alden, Wiggins, & Pincus, 2000) was used to assess interpersonal problems and interpersonal distress, and the Psychopathy Checklist–Revised (PCL–R; Hare, 2003) was used to assess psychopathy. For females, there were no significant correlations between psychopathy scores and the IIP–64 scales. For males, there was a statistically significant positive correlation between PCL–R scores and scores on the IIP–64 Domineering scale and a statistically significant negative correlation between the PCL–R scores and scores on the IIP–64 Overly Accommodating scale. However, there were no other significant correlations for males between PCL–R scores and scores on the IIP–64 scales. Furthermore, there was no significant difference on IIP–64 total scores between females scoring high in psychopathy and females scoring low in psychopathy. Similarly, there were no significant difference on IIP–64 total scores between males scoring high in psychopathy and males scoring low in psychopathy. Finally, there was no significant multivariate main effect for sex on the IIP–64 scales assessed. Implications of the results, strengths and limitations of the study, and future directions for research are discussed.


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