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Thesis

The relationship between distance, frequency and intensity of training on triathlon performance and injury incidence

1 May 1988

Abstract

Results from a five-part, 30-question survey were analyzed to determine the relationships between distances, frequencies, and intensities of training on triathlon performance and injury incidence. Questionnaires were mailed to all (614) triathletes who officially finished the 1987 USTS Bud Light Portland Triathlon. The total number of properly completed returned surveys was 255 (42%); 52 (20%) of these surveys were from women; 203 (80%) of these surveys were from men. Analysis of the data supported the following conclusions: (a) A possible overtraining effect on the performance levels occurred within the female elite triathlete division; (b) Each sport segment was nearly evenly weighted in relation to its influence on the overall time in the broad female and male categories; (c) In the female elite category the race was more weighted toward the run segment; (d) In the male elite category the race was more weighted toward the bike segment; (e) Performance times were modified even with increasing age; and (f) No significant relationship was found between injury incidence and training parameters.


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