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Capstone

Etiology and Treatment of Overuse Injuries of the Tibia

1 May 2006

Abstract

1. Title: Etiology and treatment of overuse injuries of the tibia.

2. Clinical Bottom Line: Not everyone sustains an overuse injury, but there are a consistent percentage of people who do. Many studies have looked at a variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors leading to an overuse injury. We wanted to know if there are consistent biomechanical risk factors that can be accounted for, and if so, could they be used as a part of a screening tool and also treated in order to prevent injury.

3. Clinical Scenario: In an article written by Belinda R. Beck, current conservative management of overuse injuries involves rest from a range of 1 to 16 weeks, some clinicians choose to cast and approximately 48.8% of clinicians surveyed recommend stretching the triceps surae. These are the most common approaches that have been used in the clinic for treating overuse injuries. We would like to know how effective these are and what are some of the ideal treatment/preventative measures for those found with an identified biomechanical risk factor.

4. Our Clinically Answerable Questions:

a. PICO#1 i. Population: The populations we are focusing on are athletes or people experiencing an increase in physical training. ii. Intervention: A significant period of repetitive weight bearing activity. iii. Comparison: biomechanical factors of those who developed a stress injury of the tibia compared to those who did not. iv. Outcome: Biomechanical assessments of the lower extremities.

b. PICO#2 i. Population: The populations we are focusing on are athletes or people experiencing an increase in physical training. ii. Intervention: We are looking at orthotics, insoles, stretching, and strengthening as treatment options. iii. Comparison: No preventative measures. iv. Outcome: We are looking at the incidence of injury among our populations.


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