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Dissertation

The impact of self-care, coping, and organizational support on compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout in sexual assault advocates

1 January 2016

Abstract

Previous research has demonstrated both positive and negative outcomes of being a sexual assault advocate (e.g., fear, anger, resiliency). This study examined the impact of self-care, coping strategies, and self-efficacy beliefs on compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout among a national sample of sexual assault advocates (N=175). Results show satisfaction with self-care, style of coping, and self-efficacy regarding coping explained 33% of the variability in compassion satisfaction scores, R2 = .330, F (5, 169) = 16.63, p < .001. Additionally, satisfaction with self-care, style of coping, and self-efficacy regarding coping explained 43.5% of variability in burnout scores, R2 = .435, F (5, 169) = 26.05, p < .001. Finally, satisfaction with self-care, style of coping, and self-efficacy regarding coping explained 34.8% variability in secondary traumatic stress scores, R2 = .348, F (5, 169) = 18.01, p < .001. Sexual assault agencies should focus on quantity of self-care, engaged coping styles, and increasing self-efficacy beliefs to promote job satisfaction and potentially reduce turnover. Furthermore, engaging in highly satisfying quality of self-care and increasing self-efficacy beliefs will have the greatest impact on reducing secondary traumatic stress levels. Overall, engaging in highly satisfying quality and quantity of self-care, using engaged coping styles, and having the belief one can cope have the greatest impact on the short-term and long-term consequences of helping traumatized populations.


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